WIRE COLLATED NAILS

Paper Collated Nails
Paper Collated Nails

STRAPTITE

Paper Collated Nails

PLASTIC COLLATED NAIL

Paper Collated Nails
Paper Collated Nails

PAPER COLLATED NAIL

RVT

DUPLEX NAIL

RVT

COMMON NAIL

FINISH NAIL

BOX NAIL

JOIST HANGER

COLLATED SCREWS

COLLATION

PLASTIC STRIP

Generally used for 20° - 22° framing nails. They are held together by a strip of plastic that breaks apart when red by a gun. They are often less expensive than other types of collated fasteners because they are easier to manufacture. They can become very brittle when cold, and the residual plastic must be disposed of pieces of plastic are sometimes left under the head causing the nail to be exposed.

WIRE WELD (WIRE STRIP, WIRE COIL)

Generally used for 28° strip nails and 15° coil nails. Wire strip fasteners use thin pieces of wire run lengthwise to hold the fasteners in position. They are not as susceptible to water or cold weather as paper or plastic collated nails, however, the wire may y off, and they are susceptible to having pieces of wire stuck under the head exposing the nails.

PLASTIC COIL

Generally used for 15° - 90° coil nails. Fasteners are inserted into a plastic band. The plastic band exit's the coil nailer in one piece eliminating pieces of plastic stuck under the nail head when the nail is driven and making for easy cleanup. Plastic coil collation is a higher priced alternative to plastic strip and is most commonly used for siding and applications where less reloading is desired.

PAPER STRIP

Generally used for 30° - 34° farming nails. Fasteners are held together by a strip of paper with glue. The paper around the fastener is driven into the wood along with the fastener. Paper tape reduces the risk of having material stuck under the nail head leaving the top easily break apart and do not work weil in wet or moist conditions because the nails can become loose

COMPONENTS

ANGLE- the degree of collation.

CROWN - the width across the top of a staple.

GAUGE - references how thick a fastener is, with lower numbers indicating greater thickness.

HEAD- round metal piece formed at the top of the nail.

LEG - the length of a staple from the top of the crown to the point.

LENGTH - distance from the bottom of the head to the point of a nail.

POINT - sharpened end opposite the head forgreater ease in driving.

SHANK - the length of the nail between the head and the point; may be smooth, or have rings or spirals for greater holding power.

COATINGS

BRITE (BRIGHT) - there is no coating to protect the steel and the fastener is susceptible to corrosion if exposed to high humidity or water; not recommended for exterior use or in treated lumber, and only for interior applications where no corrosion protection is needed; often used for interior framing, trim and finish applications

ELECTRO GALVANIZED - zinc plating process in which a layer of zinc is bonded to steel in order to protect against corrosion; smooth, shiny finish--generally used in areas where minimal corrosion protection is needed.

EXTERIOR GALVANIZED- a high-grade anti-corrosion surface treatment technology consisting of three layers: 1) metallic zinc, 2) a high-grade anti-corrosion chemical conversion film, and 3) a baked ceramic top coating; used in outdoor applications – meets ASTM B117

HOT DIPPED GALVANIZED - the most common method of galvanization where iron, steel or aluminum are coated with a thin zinc layer by passing the metal through a molten bath of zinc that results in very high corrosion resistance suitable for some acidic and treated lumber; will corrode over time as the coating wears, but generally good for the lifetime of the application; typically used in outdoor applications--meets ASTM A153.

STAINLESS STEEL - used where both the properties of steel and corrosion resistance are required; although stainless steel does not readily corrode, it isn’t fully stain proof--certain conditions can and do affect it such as low oxygen, high salinity, or poor circulation environments; 300 series stainless makes up 70% of all stainless used, and is the most corrosion resistant, ductile, and weldable type of stainless steel; these alloys are subject to crevice corrosion and pitting corrosion.

  • 304 / 305 grade alloys are the most versatile and widely used of stainless steels--contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel; recommended for exterior applications where a higher level of corrosion resistance is desired.
  • 316 (also called marine grade) has superior corrosion resistance versus other chromium-nickel steels when exposed to chemical corrodents such as sea water; slightly more nickel and the addition of 2% molybdenum is what makes 316 considerably more resistant to corrosion than the 304 family; recommended for marine environments.

HEADS

BRADS

Smaller head allows nail to be concealed more easily; limited holding power; used for finish and trim work

ROUND HEAD

Heads are completely round, like standard hand-drive framing nails, and provide greater resistance to pull out. The nail strips are paper tape or plastic collated. Since the heads are fully round, a space must be maintained between the shanks, meaning that the collation wraps each nail rather than just being applied to the sides.

CLIPPED HEAD

Standard round-head nail on the front side, but the back of the head is clipped off flush with the shank of the nail. Nails can be placed closer together, which facilitates less frequent reloading. A specially coated paper strip applied to both sides of the clip keeps the nails in place. Some jurisdictions, especially in areas subject to sudden bursts of high wind such as hurricanes, don’t allow the use of clipped-head framing nails.

OFFSET ROUND HEAD

Instead of the head being centered on the shank, the head is offset to one side, allowing the shanks to touch one another when collated. These heads are designed to be fired in a clipped-head nailer, effectively turning a clipped head into a round-head nailer.

COMPONENTS

SMOOTH

Most common and often used for framing and general construction applications; offer enough holding power for most everyday use.

RING

Small directional rings on the shank prevent the nail from working back out once driven in; provide superior holding power over smooth shank nails because the wood fills in the crevasse of the rings and provides friction to help prevent the nail from backing out over time; often used in softer types of wood where splitting is not an issue.

DRIVE SCREW

Have helical shanks resembling a screw; drive screw nails are mostly used with hardwood; provide greater holding power; sustain greater short welding impact withdrawal work values than do other nail forms.

POINTS

DIAMOND POINT

A 4-sided pyramid; most common point.

BLUNT DIAMOND POINT

Rounded diamond point to drive easier than a blunt nail without splitting.

BLUNT POINT

Reduces the chance of splitting wood but is more difficult to drive.

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